Maple Syrup Nutrion

 Notes: The values shown are the overall minimum values for the minerals and nutrients and the overall maximum values for the calories reported by the USDA Nutrient Database and the Canadian Nutrient File. The percent daily values (% DV) were calculated using the Health Canada recommended daily intake values for an average 2,000 calorie diet.

Notes: The values shown are the overall minimum values for the minerals and nutrients and the overall maximum values for the calories reported by the USDA Nutrient Database and the Canadian Nutrient File. The percent daily values (% DV) were calculated using the Health Canada recommended daily intake values for an average 2,000 calorie diet.

 
 USDA Database for the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of Selected Foods. Results showing the antioxidant power of maple syrup were obtained from Brunswick Laboratories, a USDA-certified facility.

USDA Database for the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of Selected Foods. Results showing the antioxidant power of maple syrup were obtained from Brunswick Laboratories, a USDA-certified facility.

  • Maple syrup contains up to 24 antioxidants. Antioxidants are beneficial for reducing damage done by free radicals, such as inflammation and chronic disease.
  • Maple syrup contains fairly large amounts of Zinc and Manganese. Zinc helps you fight illness and strengthens your immune system. Manganese plays a crucial role in your metabolism, calcium absorption, blood sugar regulation, and brain/nerve function.
  • Maple sugar has a lower score on the Glycemic Index than refined sugar.
  • Maple Sugar fights inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis, IBS, and heart disease. It also can reduce aging and strengthen your immune system by reducing oxidative stress.
  • Maple syrup is a great sweetener alternative. It's free from chemicals, and only 3/4 cup of maple sugar is needed for every 1 cup of sugar a recipe calls for. This means you use less sweetener overall.